Active Aging

Active Aging is a series of safe group exercise classes designed for adults who want to continue enjoying an active and spirited lifestyle.

Aqua Aerobics

Come experience all the benefits the water can provide in this guided 45-minute music filled balance, cardiovascular, and muscle strength building class. Low impact so it’s easy on the joints but provides resistance to the working muscle for an overall body benefit. Because it’s water you can work as hard or as easy as you are able so it is appropriate for people of all physical abilities and levels.

Aqua Zumba

Aqua Zumba brings new meaning to the idea of an invigorating workout. It combines the South American Zumba rhythm and dance steps with a pool party! There is less impact on your joints during an Aqua Zumba® class so you can really let loose. Water creates natural resistance, which means every step is more challenging and helps tone your muscles. If you like to dance and have fun, come join us!

Pilates

This class is designed to work your powerhouse muscles – abs, lower back, thighs, and buttocks. The discipline emphasizes correct form to help develop strength, flexibility, muscular endurance, coordination, balance, & good posture. Designed for all levels.

PiYo

What is PiYo? It is a fusion-style of group exercise that features movements inspired by, but not limited, the best of Pilates and yoga. It is a music-driven, athletic workout that will strengthen, stretch and sculpt your body. All fitness levels will be challenged in a low impact, heat-generating workout. There will be modifications and progressions given to create a workout that is just right for you.

Retrofit

Retrofit is a moderate-paced, low-impact class designed for participants who are comfortable with basic choreography and want a little more! The focus is on simple movement patterns. This is a great starting class and a lot of fun. Bands and weights are used for total body conditioning.

Strength & Stretch

This class is for any fitness level. The focus is on a combination of body weight exercises, bands, and other tools to challenge your strength and full body stretching to compliment your training program.

Strong & Stable

Strong and Stable is a moderately-paced strengthening and balance exercise class for adults. Every class features exercise to increase balance, mobility, and strength in order for you to continue enjoying an active and fulfilling lifestyle. Safe and sound physical conditioning enables you to enjoy your daily living activities, and increase your endurance and energy. Develop the confidence to accomplish and complete what you wish to do and gain your Second Wind for all seasons of your life!

Yoga

A gentle approach to learning the yoga postures using props and careful alignment/adjustments for each student. We welcome all who are healthy and injury free.

Aging in Place by Design

“Aging in place” is a term used to describe the lifestyle choice for staying in your home, safely and independently, for as long as possible. Successful aging in place includes safety elements, health and support systems. It’s a description of how you want to live today and in the future. Proactively making decisions to reach that goal makes the transition of aging easier and less costly. Want more information? Contact Susan Landsem. Aging in Place by Design

New Flooring

by BAC Staff on July 12, 2019

Summer can be a good time for home renovations and a great time to replace old flooring, as doors can be kept open to keep dust and odors down to a minimum.

Kitchens and bathrooms are the high traffic areas in our homes. Replacing the flooring can make a room look fresh and contemporary. Here are some helpful considerations to keep in mind when shopping for new flooring. Overall, your new floors should be easy to clean, durable, comfortable to stand on and fit your price point. Slip resistance is an important component to keep in mind, particularly in these rooms where spills and overflows can happen.

Wood floors are good-looking and can be cleaned with a broom, vacuum or light mopping. They are soft and can be scratched or dented. Generally, refinishing wood floors requires a professional. When dry, wood offers good slip resistance and is not recommended for bathrooms. Depending on the variety, wood will be the most expensive choice for flooring.

Porcelain tile floors are easily cleaned with a broom and mop and have a hard protective surface that makes them impervious to water and stain resistant. They are durable, won’t scuff or scratch, and can be texturized for slip resistance. Tile comes in many colors, patterns and easily worked into any decor. On the flip side, tile floors can be cold to walk on, and noisy if walking in heels or hard soled shoes. There are tile products made specifically with slip-resistant materials. Smaller tiles, 2” x 2” are recommended for showers and bathrooms. Tile is in the mid-range price point of flooring materials.

People like to use small rugs and runners on tile and wood to make them more comfortable to stand on. Unfortunately, both of these can be tripping hazards and not recommended in these areas.

Vinyl floors are easy to clean, durable and the most water resistant flooring choice. Vinyl flooring can be damaged by sharp objects, but there are repair systems that work well. It’s economical and there are slip-resistant options available. The drawback to vinyl is that it is made of synthetic material and can not be recycled. A similar product, linoleum, is made from natural materials which makes it a more sustainable product. It is, however, more expensive and less water-resistant than vinyl.

These are the most popular choices of flooring, but this is not a comprehensive list. I recommend consulting with a flooring expert to determine what will work best for you. If your priority is traction and safety, I recommend non-slip vinyl flooring. There are many choices at every price point that will be easy to clean, long-lasting and lovely to look at.

Susie Landsem
Aging in Place by Design
Susie is a consultant for Aging in Place. Contact her if you have questions about adding safety and comfort solutions to your home.

Categories: Aging in Place by Design

Are you getting enough sleep?

by BAC Staff on June 22, 2019

We are increasingly aware of how good sleep affects our well being. It’s not just the hours spent in bed, it’s also the quality of sleep that is critical for good health. Here are some of the benefits of consistent good nights rest:

  • Helps maintain a healthy weight
  • Reduces stress
  • Improves memory
  • Lowers risk for serious health issues
  • Reduces inflammation

There are several things to do that will help you get a good night’s sleep.

Get ready for bed.

  • Finish eating 2 hours before you go to sleep.
  • Exercise daily (at least 3 hours before bed).
  • Turn off the screens, including phones, tablets, computers, and the t.v.
  • Go to sleep close to the same time every night.
  • Make a rest ritual before bed. Try reading, stretching or taking a leisurely stroll to relax from the day’s stress.

Create a sanctuary.
Your bedroom’s environment can have a big impact on the quality of your sleep. Design your surroundings for peace and calm.

  • Make sure you have a good bed. If your mattress is over 8 years old, you might want to consider getting a new one. They lose their integrity over time.
  • Color your room calm. Muted shades of blues, grays, and greens create a restful tone. If you love color, use accents like colorful pillows and throws that can be removed at bedtime.
  • Keep it dark. Light can make it hard to fall asleep, or stay asleep. Look for culprits like digital clocks, cable boxes, computers, and phones. Put them away or cover them up to prevent getting disturbed by them. Dark out shades are great for keeping all of the natural, neighbors and street lights out of your bedroom at night.
  • Keep it quiet. Noises can interrupt your rest. Try closing the windows to keep outside noise belongs. There are lots of options for white noise machines that provide soothing sound and block out annoying sounds.
  • Cool rooms are the best for a good night’s sleep. 67° to 70° is optimal.

Bedroom safety is important.
With the lights turned off, it’s easy to bump into dressers and chairs or trip over rugs and clutter. Keeping a tidy room is a good start to safety and adds to the peaceful zone you’ve created in your sanctuary.

  • Stacked books, baskets or anything else left on the floor should be picked up and stored away.
  • Make sure there are clear paths to doors, the closet, and bathroom.
  • Remove small rugs in the bedroom, bathroom, and halls.
  • dd sensor lights low on the walls and halls, 18” high or so, to light your way to the bathroom.
  • Organize cords and keep them out of walking paths. When possible, it’s best to tack cords down along the base of walls so they are out of the way.

Getting enough quality sleep is important to good health. Improving your nightly rituals, and creating a calm and safe atmosphere in the bedroom will help you get the rest you need. Wake up bright and re-charged to enjoy your day.

Susie Landsem
Aging in Place by Design
Susie is a consultant for Aging in Place. Contact her if you have questions about adding safety and comfort solutions to your home.

Categories: Aging in Place by Design

5 Simple Steps to Safety on Your Deck and Porch

by BAC Staff on May 8, 2019

May is my favorite month of the year. Besides the excellent celebrations of Mother’s Day, Memorial Day and my birthday, May brings some of the best weather we have in the Pacific Northwest. That means spending time outside on our decks and porches. We want to make sure that both are safe. Here are 5 steps towards your deck safety:

Check the Deck
Winter weather can do damage to decks by snow and rain causing cracks and loosening connections. Look all the way around your deck, including underneath if possible, checking for loose or rotting boards, rusty connections, and screws in the structure. These things need to be fixed right away.

If you don’t have the skill or experience to do this kind of work, find a handyman. The BIAWC website and Angie’s List are great referral sites for qualified contractors.

Test the Railings and Stair Treads
Just like the deck, stairs and handrails can get cracked or loosened over the winter. Make sure that treads are sturdy, with no wiggles. Handrails should be tightly fastened. Harsh weather can make paint blister, causing cracks and splinters on the handrail. Sand these down until they’re smooth and repaint as necessary.

Handrails for Safety
Consider adding handrails to stairs that don’t have any, even short sections of stairs. They’re good for everyone using the stairs and particularly helpful for older people who have less mobility.

Clean the Deck
A winter’s worth of weather will add debris and dirt to the deck. In some cases, mold and mildew can develop, making the deck slippery and dangerous. Sweep the deck first, getting rid leaves and dirt. Some people like to pressure wash at this point. Be sure to read the warning labels about the recommended pressure to use on wood or composite deck before starting. It’s easy to take off paint and even crack the wood if you are too enthusiastic.

Once the surface is clear, it’s time to use a deck cleaner for the wash cycle. Cleaning agents TSP and bleach have been used for years, but they are toxic both to the user and the environment. Consider using a homemade mixture of vinegar and water or baking soda and water, or an environmentally approved cleaner like Simple Green. Look for the Green Seal to know a product has been certified for environmental and health excellence.

Add the Finishing Touch
After cleaning, your deck may need to be repainted, stained or sealed now that it’s been cleaned. Consider using a paint that has non-slip texture in it for added safety. Anti-slip stair tread tape is easy to install. Add lighting to avoid tripping accidents and a nice glow in the evening. Solar powered sensor lights are great for this purpose.

Clear the Clutter
Most decks and porches don’t have built-in storage, but there is lots of stuff that accumulates on them. Chairs, cushions, barbeque tools, planters, and hoses are some of the items that may end up on your deck, causing tripping hazards. Attractive weather resistant storage boxes provide a way to stow the stuff and additional seating.

According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, an average of 33,000 people are injured because of structural failure of a deck, porch, railing or staircase. Now is the time to make sure your deck is a safe place to enjoy the sun. A little maintenance will go a long way towards your summer enjoyment and safety.

Susie Landsem
Aging in Place by Design
Susie is a consultant for Aging in Place. Contact her if you have questions about adding safety and comfort solutions to your home.

Categories: Aging in Place by Design

11 Tips to get your garden ready for Spring

by BAC Staff on March 11, 2019
woman planting flowers in backyard garden flowerbed

It’s been a cold February, but hopefully, now we’ve seen the end of the snow. It’s time to get the garden ready for early blooms and a summer of beauty. Here are some quick tips to get your garden growing.

– Check your tools. It’s a good time to clean and sharpen your tools if needed. Store them in an organized and safe place.

– Clean up the garden. Weeds and bugs have been waiting for Spring just as much as you have. Clear them out of the garden now before they have a chance to spread their seeds.

– Get rid of leaves and debris. Rake up Winter’s leftover leaves and mulch.

– Improve the soil. Your dirt will benefit from some added nutrients. If you’re not sure what’s best, reach out to any of our local garden stores for information.

– Prune bushes and shrubs. It’s a good time to cut back new growth before it starts to bloom. If you wait too long, the deer will do it for you.

– Add som e quick and easy color. Once the soil is ready, plant bulbs and perennials to brighten the yard.

– Raise the beds. Bending over while working can wreak havoc on your back and muscles. Consider raised beds this year. You can find them already built, or ready to build kits in local stores.

– Pay it forward. Do you have a neighbor or loved one who isn’t able to tend to their garden this year? They will appreciate the help. (Hint: They might like a raised bed, too).

– Find some help. Whatcom County has a lot of skilled landscapers. Get someone out to help with the heavy stuff or to get rid of everything you just pruned and raked.

– Be mindful. We work hard to stay in shape all year long to stay flexible, strong and healthy. It’s easy to be eager in your clean-up and underestimate your garden’s challenges. Be mindful of your body position when lifting, digging and stretching. Ask a trainer at one of the Clubs for the right ways to lift before you start, or you may be getting similar advice from your chiropractor or physical therapist.

– Take a break. Rome wasn’t built in a day and your garden doesn’t have to get ready in one either. Remember to take regular breaks, drink lots of water and stretch your muscles periodically through the day. Your body will thank you.

March is a great time to enjoy the longer days, a little more sunshine and the Spring colors from the garden. Spending some time cleaning up your garden today will give you months of pleasure during the summer. 

Susie Landsem
Aging in Place by Design
Susie is a consultant for Aging in Place. Contact her if you have questions about adding safety and comfort solutions to your home.

Categories: Aging in Place by Design

Kitchen Mishaps

by BAC Staff on February 3, 2019

We had a little set-back in the kitchen the other day – a clogged drain. What a nuisance, particularly for my husband who took it upon himself to clean it (thank you, Doug). Hot water didn’t work and the sink started backing up with more water. He put a bucket under the drain pipe and opened it up to clear the clog. Just going to say, it was not a pleasant sight. After he put it back together again, the drain ran smoothly. Yea for my handyman.

This experience got me to thinking on ways to avoid this issue again. Here are some ideas for sink maintenance and clog prevention in the kitchen and bathroom.

Avoid the problem in the first place

1) Make sure grease and oil don’t go down the drain. Wipe out any grease or fats from your pans before cleaning them in the sink.

2) Use a strainer to stop bits of food and debris from going down the drain. This goes for bathroom drains, too, catching hair and soap before they go down the drain. Clean the strainer regularly.

3) Don’t put anything fibrous down the disposal. Things like banana and citrus fruit peels, celery, potato peels are examples of food that the disposal can’t handle. My Plumber said to avoid egg shells and coffee grounds, too.                       

4) Always run water while using the disposal.

When clogs happen, avoid harsh chemicals and products.

1)  Pour boiling hot water down the drain. A few pots may break down the clog. If you have pvc pipes, this is not a good strategy. The pipes are plastic and the boiling hot water may cause the connections to loosen.

2) Baking soda and vinegar can work as effective solvents. Pour ½ cup baking soda down the drain. If you have a double sink, plug one of the drains. Then put ½ cup of vinegar down over the baking soda. There will be bubbles, like your school volcano experiment. Cover the drain and let sit for ½ hour to dissolve the clog. Run hot water to rinse and hopefully this will clear the clog.

3) Remove the pea trap in the drain. This is a more complicated process and certainly doable by someone who’s handy around the house. Turn off the water, place a bucket under the drain, and unscrew the pipe. The drain should be clear and the backed up water in the sink will clear into the bucket. Clear the plug, wash the pipe thoroughly and put the drain back together. It’s a good idea to run hot water through the pipes again to clear any remaining residue.

If these steps haven’t worked, more options are to use a plunger made for sinks, a plumber’s snake or call a plumber.

Prevention and regular maintenance are the best tactics to take, and what we’ll be doing in the future!

Susie Landsem
Aging in Place by Design
Susie is a consultant for Aging in Place. Contact her if you have questions about adding safety and comfort solutions to your home.

Categories: Aging in Place by Design

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